Tag Archives: oneshot

Aka chiten – Hayashi Seiichi

A  oneshot from Garo 1969-08.

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This is a surreal set of images that are connected primarily by dialog speculating on “him” (where is “he”, is “he” alive or dead, when will “he” arrive", is “he” already here?). In the final panel, there is a hand shown opening a sliding door, with a bright 5-pointed star in the background. You could read in a reference to Communist China if you like.

Katsumata Susumu Works #40 – Katsumata Susumu

A  oneshot from Garo 1969-08.

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Rather than the standard 3- and 4-panel gag strips, we get a guitar-player going around drumming up business for a hostess club, and basically ridiculing the customers. One such customer goes to the bar and finds two of his sons standing outside. They argue then commiserate with each other before leaving. This is then followed by just two 4-panel gag strips.

Souretsu mu tsuchi-koku chi senki 2 – Tsurita Kuniko

A magazine-only oneshot from Garo 1969-08.

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This is the second half of the story. The travelers set up a campsite on the island and treat it all as a big picnic. The Japanese navy arrives and orders them to go back home and they refuse. By accident, the fat rich kid stumbles on a rock on a hilltop, triggering an avalanche that crashes down on the destroyer. This starts a war with the navy using their big guns, and the travelers using slingshots, swords and a spear. One woman, the one with a spear that loves Edo-period dramas, starts out thinking that if she’s going to die here that she’d rather do it by her own hand. However, she pulls her head out of the noose and decides that she’d rather die in a hail of bullets. She gets shot, and dies thinking that neither choice was really all that preferable. A small boat arrives with two men and a lot of film equipment. The travelers think they’ve been saved, but rather than helping out, the two newbies start filming the battle, and asking people to do a better job of looking good when they die. The prophet that started all of this pulls out his katana to show how a real samurai fights, but he turns out to be incompetent. The prophet tells his assistant to fight for him, and the boy lights the fuse to a pile of gunpowder kegs and bombs. The island blows up, killing everyone but the itinerant priest. The priest turns away, muttering a prayer to the souls of the dead, and he leaves.

There are a couple sight gags here, including cameo appearances by Tezuka’s “pig character”, and Fujio Akatsuka’s Nyarome cat.